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Indian Federalism after Covid - Shared screen with speaker view
alia bhatt
01:21:25
hi i
Prannv Dhawan
01:31:04
there was a widespread concern about the government's apathy towards migrant workers and the vulnerable citizens. given that the implementation of social security schemes is the domain of the states, what could have been a better response to alleviate human suffering? how does the court's intervention and it's desirability come into the picture?
Aditya
01:39:05
States are not getting their due shares of GST collection
Aditya
01:39:24
Why are they not challenging it in the courts?
Phalguni Sundaram Biswal (INDIA)
01:45:01
Will India be a loser or a winner under this changing dynamics of the global economicsystem.?.
Bharat Harne
01:50:01
what do you think is the future of state finances especially in the context of15th finance commission?
Lilly Tyagi
01:50:15
When we talk about Uttar Pradesh particularly it has got to do with its population and division of seats is prima facie related to the same. Thus equal representation of other states would be arbitrary here
Phalguni Sundaram Biswal (INDIA)
01:52:23
what India should do to ensure bothlives and livelihood and help post-pandemic economy recovery.?.
Irfan Ibrahim
01:53:10
Since there is differences in the tax contribution from states, how can we tackle this problem and ensure development ?
Aneesha Chitgupi
01:53:29
Do you think there is a possibility that the ongoing pandemic and the present adverse/ slightly aggressive world order (especially with belligerent neighbours) may give the Centre a window to erode the federal set-up? Movement towards more concentration of resources and power, this being justified as need for national security?
Asmita
01:56:12
What kind of reform do we need in the Centre-state relations to deal with Public Health Emergencies?
Phalguni Sundaram Biswal (INDIA)
02:07:53
Can we envisage of artificial intelligence orrobots to take charge.?.
Ashish Gosain
02:15:08
Dr. Amal Many Thanks for your presentation. Regarding the restructuring of the Rajya Sabha, that decision is politically laden, since it's constitution is immune from electoral pressures for a purpose and is effectively the only place where intellectuals from all walks of Life; Achievers are finding representation. While the position of Delhi in the overall scheme has been firmly entrenched, what should be the way forward in such a scenario of centralisation Enabling Panchayati Raj has been limited in it's implementation on the ground, the role of cantonment Boards in the cities where the pandemic is currently spreading has been a case of neglect and apathy. Funding crunches , issues on payment of salaries have obstructed their smooth functioning. Giving execution without any powers has been seen in the current pandemic , would such bodies really be interested in lower-level implementation without proper support from the government. Capacity and Capbility differences in relation to containment strategy is a g
Ashish Gosain
02:16:06
*good example
Anujay Shrivastava
02:16:19
Considering the practical difficulties and challenges that a State may face in case it wishes to "not" implement a union directive, would it be appropriate for the Indian Parliament to have a consultation with all Indian States and come up with a "constitutional amendment" to Part XVIII in order to address emergencies such as COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences (including lockdowns)? Or would such a move potentially create further complications in India's existing federal structure, and perhaps an independent mediation body may be set up to resolve disputes in a quicker and effective way between States and the Union?
Ashish Gosain
02:19:08
GST On Petroleum productsis another policy example
Alok
02:24:46
https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3087464
Lilly Tyagi
02:26:22
If we consider decentralizing the government offices from the capital city, will it not debase the federal structure rather if we consider to franchise out from Delhi itself and thus keeping the basic structure intact
Ashish Gosain
02:34:20
Actually, the centralisation in Delhi is purely circumstantial and not specifically mandated..Centralisation in any other place would have the same impact. Surely, You couldn't have multiple Parliaments in each State. Legislatures have been there for that reason. We have seen how even Delhi Central Government Hospitals are not very heavily funded by Centre, where as we receive flak for too much centralisation. What is the guarantee that given it to State like say Bihar the condition of the Nalanda Medical College and Hospital or the Gorakhpur Hospital would really improve. ? Would cantonement Bopards and local bodies be really ableto make any difference at provisioining levels even ?
Rishav Ranjan
02:39:42
Amal Sir,Please mention that Prof's name and Blog once again.
Amal Sethi
02:40:16
https://www.democratic-decay.org/
Amal Sethi
02:40:46
Tom Daly - University of Melbourne
Rishav Ranjan
02:40:57
Thanks. 😊
Anujay Shrivastava
02:49:53
Thank you, Dr. Amal! I agree with most of your points, especially about the Supreme Court. Your earlier discussion emphasizing how High Courts can be great institutions to assist in dealing with such issues and providing quicker remedies to concerning situations also ties in well with this.
Irfan Ibrahim
02:55:15
Great session by Dr. Amal and Alok ! Really insightful with respect to federalism and constitutionalism.Looking forward to more such insightful webinars by LSPR.
Jehosh Paul
02:56:42
Thank You Sir